Making the case for financing health care for children and youth with special health care needs?

4 ways the Catalyst Center State-at-a-glance Chartbook can help

Drawing of children in front of map of United States.

The Catalyst Center has updated and expanded the web-based State-at-a-glance Chartbook you have come to rely on to make the case for improving coverage and financing of care for children and youth with special health care needs (CYSHCN) in your state. With this latest update, you can now take a closer look at many areas to discover where there may be inequities in health care coverage among different subgroups of CYSHCN in your state.  Here’s what this tool allows you to do:

  1. Put the spotlight on children and youth with special health care needs

    The State-at-a-glance Chartbook combines data from several reliable sources to give you up-to-date information about CYSHCN and children in general for each state and the District of Columbia. There is data about
    • Demographics on children and CYSHCN
    • Economics such as household income, unemployment rate, employer size and Medicaid eligibility
    • Child health services including mental health, oral health, and foster care
    • Factors influencing health insurance coverage including public/private insurance and national health care reform indicators
    • Experience with the system of care for CYSHCN as reflected in how well states meet several Maternal and Child Health outcome criteria
    • The Title V program financing and family involvement

  2. Show how your state fares compared to others and the nation

    You can look up data for your own state and compare data from two states and the nation in a single printable table

  3. Discover data sources you can trust

    The most recent data from many sources combine to tell the story of CYSHCN in your state. With the check of a box, you can see detailed source information for the National Survey of Children’s Health, the National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs, the Kaiser Family Foundation, the U.S. Department of Education, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and more--all carefully selected to provide you with easy-to-access data that you can rely on for accuracy.

  4. Demonstrate differences in subgroups of children by age, race, income, and more

    This latest expansion enables you to discover where there may be inequities in health care coverage among different subgroups of CYSHCN in your state. The state data pages now include data from the 2009/2010 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care needs that provide specific information about CYSHCN based on

    • Race/Ethnicity: Whether the child is Hispanic, White non-Hispanic, Black non-Hispanic, or Other non-Hispanic;
    • Sex: Whether the child is male or female;
    • Age: Whether the child is 0-5 years, 6-11 years, or 12-17 years;
    • Primary household language: Whether the child is Hispanic and lives in a Spanish language household, Hispanic and lives in an English language household, or non-Hispanic;
    • Household income: Whether the child lives in a family whose household income is 0-99% of the federal poverty level (FPL), 100-199% FPL, 200-399% FPL, or 400% or more FPL;
    • Number of functional difficulties: Whether the child has no difficulties, 1 difficulty, 2 difficulties, 3 difficulties, or 4 or more difficulties.

P.S. New to using data to make the case for CYSHCN? Check out Dancing with Data for useful tips on using data to support your message.

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